by Lena Aburdene Derhally

There is something wonderful about the fact that much of my day is spent focused on the present moment and not filled with multitasking and half efforts.

There is something wonderful about the fact that much of my day is spent focused on the present moment and not filled with multitasking and half efforts.

Recently a friend and I were talking about the modern world and how the quality of relationships has been impacted because of it. We live in a culture of busy-ness and our communities are not as intact as they once were. Many people live far away from family and close friends as people often move for new job opportunities or to chase a new adventure. Not that any of this is necessarily bad, but being too busy and not having a community can make us feel lonely, disconnected and withdrawn.

Many people have described the harried feeling to me- the way it feels when you are multitasking through the whole day and don’t have the time to focus on one thing because so much needs to get done. It makes us feel like we are running through life, not enjoying it and truly living it.

As I thought about how this works in my own life I realized that I try to make a conscious effort on a daily basis to just focus on my kids or my husband or something like my writing, which I enjoy very much.

However, when I’m at work as a psychotherapist I am forced to be present and in the moment because that’s the only way I can effectively do my job. There is something wonderful about the fact that much of my day is spent focused on the present moment and not filled with multitasking and half efforts.

Then I think about my client in the chair opposite of me and how this is the one hour of their day where they can be in the present and truly focus on themselves- not on another person or a task but truly have that special time that everyone needs to reflect.

In a world where we don’t make the time to focus on ourselves or the present moment, psychotherapy provides that space. Without that space and that self care we cannot thrive. Psychotherapy is an invaluable resource because of this- not just for the client but for the clinician as well.

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